What's Happening This Week
(All events in Eastern Time)

Sun, April 18 at 6 p.m.: Native/Indigenous Community Resources at Dartmouth

Mon, April 19 at 8 a.m.: Admitted Student Virtual Campus Tour

Mon, April 19 at 6 p.m.: Thayer School of Engineering Open House

Mon, April 19 at 7 p.m.: "The US Constitution: Does It Still Work?" Faculty Presentation by Dr. Russell Muirhead

Mon, April 19 at 8 p.m.: Rural Student Panel

Tue, April 20 at 6 p.m.: Pre-Health Open House

Tue, April 20 at 7 p.m.: "Old Footprints, New Questions" Faculty Presentation by Dr. Jeremy DeSilva

Tue, April 20 at 8 p.m.: Native/Indigenous Student Panel

Tue, April 20 at 8 p.m.: International Student Panel

Wed, April 21 at 6 p.m.: Center for Social Impact Open House

Wed, April 21 at 7 p.m.: "Quantitative Social Science and the Study of Election Integrity" Faculty Presentation by Dr. Michael Herron

Wed, April 21 at 8 p.m.: "How We Study Race: A Discussion Across Disciplines"

Thurs, April 22 at 6 p.m.: House Communities at Dartmouth

Thurs, April 22 at 7 p.m.: "Voices of the Lost" Faculty Presentation by Dr. Tarek El-Ariss

Thurs, April 22 at 8 p.m.: Advocacy, Community, & Anti-Racism Initiatives at Dartmouth 

Sat, April 24 at 3 p.m.: Admitted Student Virtual Campus Tour

 

Excellence in undergraduate teaching is one of the hallmarks of a Dartmouth education.

Our faculty are leaders in their fields and, often, mentors and friends to their students. We're delighted that several of our professors have offered to recreate the presentations they share during our typical on-campus admitted student events as Zoom webinars. Register for any of the events below to learn more about our faculty's research and teaching and ask them any questions you might have.

 

The US Constitution: Does It Still Work?

Dr. Russell Muirhead, Robert Clements Professor of Democracy and Politics, Chair of the Department of Government

A photo of professor Russell Muirhead
Monday, April 19, 7:00 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

The Constitution promises something: that the people can rule. Amid everything from pandemic to polarization, can the U.S. Constitution still work? Is the first democratic constitution in the modern world part of the solution, or part of the problem? Register here.

 

Old Footprints, New Questions

Dr. Jeremy DeSilva, Associate Professor of Anthropology

A photo of professor Jeremy DeSilva
Tuesday, April 20, 7:00 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

What do 3.5 million-year-old footprints and maple syrup-loving black bear cubs have in common? Jeremy DeSilva, an Anthropology professor at Dartmouth College, will explain how he and Dartmouth students uncovered the mystery of ancient African footprints and helped add a chapter to the story of our evolutionary past. Register here.

 

Quantitative Social Science and the Study of Election Integrity

Dr. Michael Herron, Remsen 1943 Professor of Government

A photo of Michael Herron, Remsen 1943 Professor of Government
Wednesday, April 21, 7:00 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

Michael Herron has taught at Dartmouth College since 2003. He received his doctorate from Stanford University in 1998 and currently works on issues related to election administration. He has published on election lines, the effects of ballot formats, election fraud, and absentee voting. Register here.

 

How We Study Race: A Discussion Across Disciplines

A photo of the spire on top of Dartmouth Hall
Wednesday, April 21, 8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Professors Kimberly Brown (Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing), Matthew Delmont (Professor of History), Deborah King (Associate Professor of Sociology), and Eng-Beng Lim (Associate Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) talk about their work on issues of race and racial justice and what frameworks, perspectives, and methodologies they use to conduct their research and reach their conclusions, and why those frameworks are important in a panel discussion moderated by Sonu Bedi, Professor of Government. Professor Bedi will introduce the recorded panel discussion, which was sponsored by the Rockefeller Center as part of Dartmouth's Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration in January. Register here.

 

Voices of the Lost

Dr. Tarek El-Ariss, Professor and Chair of Middle Eastern Studies

A photo of Tarek El-Ariss, Professor and Chair of Middle Eastern Studies
Thursday, April 22, 7:00 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

What happens when letters don't reach their destination and get picked up instead by total strangers? This is the premise of Lebanese author Hoda Barakat's novel, Voices of the Lost (2021), in which these letters become the language of the displaced who can no longer find their way home. Register here.

 

Through the Looking Glass of Russian and American Conspiracy Theories

Dr. Lynn Patyk, Associate Professor of Russian

A photo of Lynn Patyk, Associate Professor of Russian
Monday, April 26, 7:00 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

Conspiracy theories have exploded in recent years, and Russian conspiracy theories about the West and American conspiracy theories about Russia are often mirror images of one another. This bizarre mirror symmetry is not new: it began with Stalinism and the Cold War and revived with a vengeance under Vladimir Putin and President Trump. Join Professor Patyk to examine how these mirroring conspiracy theories are weaponized and serve as a distorting lens that further damages U.S.-Russia relations. Register here.

 

The Scandal(s) of Shakespeare's Sonnets

Dr. Matthew Ritger, Assistant Professor of English & Creative Writing

A photo of Dr. Matthew Ritger, Assistant Professor of English & Creative Writing
Tuesday, April 27, 7:00 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

Over the four centuries since Shakespeare's sonnets were first published, editors and scholars have been at war over these poems. Some of the Sonnets are addressed to an ambiguously gendered young man, called "the master-mistress of my passion," while others are directed in anguish to a "woman coloured ill." The days of editing, censoring, and rearranging the poems to cover up their complicated sexual and racial politics appear to be past. But what do the Sonnets then reveal—about Shakespeare, about the early modern period, or about our concerns as readers today? Register here.

 

Human-Centered Design for Inclusive Social Impact

Dr. Elizabeth Murnane, Charles H. Gaut & Charles A. Norberg Assistant Professor of Engineering

A photo of Elizabeth Murnane, Charles H. Gaut & Charles A. Norberg Assistant Professor of Engineering
Wednesday, April 28, 7:00 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

Human-centered design (HCD) is both a method and a mindset for problem-solving that emphasizes deeply understanding the experiences, needs, and values of people throughout the design process. In this presentation, Dr. Elizabeth Murnane will illustrate how HCD can help us respond to "wicked" problems facing society, in areas spanning medicine, education, sustainability, and beyond. Specifically, she'll share a variety of interactive technologies her lab has developed to empower people's ability to collect, make sense of, and act on data, such as personalized graphic narratives for health management, mixed-reality educational games that support curiosity-driven learning, and user interfaces that embed biophilic principles to promote both environmental consciousness and human flourishing. Register here.

 

Faculty Presentation by Dr. Mary Flanagan

A photo of Dr Mary Flanagan, Professor and Chair of Film & Media Studies
Dr. Mary Flanagan, Professor and Chair of Film & Media Studies

Thursday, April 29, 7:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Mary Flanagan, the Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor in Digital Humanities at Dartmouth College, is a leading innovator, artist, educator and designer, whose works have included everything from game-inspired art, to commercial games that shift people's thinking about biases and stereotypes. Register here.